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Plagiarism, Fair Use, and Copyright helpful hints
Last Updated: Sep 4, 2013 URL: http://libguides.trumbull.kent.edu/copyright/fair_use/plagiarism Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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What is Plagiarism?

"The action or practice of taking someone else's work, idea, etc., and passing it off as one's own; literary theft."

Source: Oxford English Dictionary

 

Avoiding Plagiarism

Plagiarism can be DELIBERATE or it can be UNINTENTIONAL. Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided by citing sources

Whenever you borrow words or ideas, you need to acknowledge their source. The following situations almost always require citation:

  • whenever you use direct quotes
  • whenever you paraphrase sentences or words.
  • whenever you use an idea that someone else has already expressed
  • whenever you make specific reference to the work of another
  • whenever someone else's work has been critical in developing your own ideas.

--excerpt from Plagiarism.org

 

Plagiarism: Why Should I Care?

Plagiarism can happen deliberately or unintentionally and should not be taken lightly. Plagiarism is like stealing and diminishes the academic value of your research and threatens academic integrity and the pursuit of information and knowledge. Take the time to understand plagiarism!


RELATED: Academic Integrity

The International Center for Academic Integrity defines academic integrity as having five components:

  1. Honesty -Turn in your own work, based on your own intellectual quest.
  2. Trust - Scholars and academic institutions should mutually support academic freedoms and foster trust in the pursuit and exchange of knowledge.
  3. Fairness - Learning experiences and interactions need to be carried out fairly and consistently according to institution policies.
  4. Respect - All opinions and exchanges must be shared with a respect of intellectual freedom and the process of learning. 
  5. Responsibility - Be accountable for the work you turn in and accept responsibility for the pursuit of your own education.
 

Kent State's Stand on Plagiarism

At this university, we seek to find truth in all its forms whether scientific, artistic, or political.  It is our expectation that Kent State students and faculty uphold the highest level of integrity, and take personal responsibility for the work they produce.  In a digital age where music, photos, and thoughts and ideas are shared freely across the globe, it is sometimes harder for individuals to determine where the line is, and how not to cross it.   However, the fundamental principles of intellectual property remain constant and pure—academic honesty is our highest responsibility. Simply put, Author Robert Fulghum said it well in his 1988 publication, All I Really Need To Know I Learned In Kindergarten, “don’t take things that aren’t yours.”

Dr. Lester A. Lefton
President, Kent State University    

KSU Plagiarism website       

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About this Libguide

Copyright and other intellectual property issues can be complex. None of the information or links provided should be substituted for the advice of an attorney.

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